Scientific American

 
Scientific American News
October 19th
Great tits in the U.K. have developed longer beaks, possibly to gain access to bird feeders -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 19th
State attempts to accelerate high-tech solutions after treatment and law enforcement fail to stem overdose fatalities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 18th
A compound that helps rodents and monkeys slim down could offer a promising approach for human therapies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 18th
DeepMind’s Go game-playing AI—which dominated its human competition—just got better -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 17th
Spatial audio promises immersive virtual experiences that engage more of the senses -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 17th
Hybridization poses an increasing threat to the nation’s beloved reptile -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 16th
Spacetime ripples from a stellar cataclysm in a distant galaxy help explain the cosmic origins of gold, and chart the course for a new age of “multi-messenger” astronomy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 16th
An experiment using a computer algorithm to create deceptive Yelp reviews was disturbingly successful, and could point to bigger problems as artificial intelligence matures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 13th
With much of the U.S. commonwealth’s cellular service and electrical grid down since Hurricane Maria, the parent company of tech giant Google could help restore wireless communication to 3.4... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 13th
Half of our home galaxy is terra incognita. That will soon change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 12th
Phlegrean Fields is waking up. Scientists are trying to predict what it will do next, and what its unrest means for volcanoes worldwide -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 11th
The ubiquitous technique for relieving stress and pain has remarkably little scientific evidence backing it, a group of scientists contend -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 11th
Shutting down the top risk gene holds potential for halting the disease process  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 10th
Vanishing public repositories of microbes, both beneficial and deadly, have been essential for advances such as penicillin and CRISPR -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 9th
The famed primatologist talks about her past work, her environmental concerns and the importance of conservation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 6th
People would rather endure jail, death or a bucket of worms than be viewed as immoral -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 5th
Researchers have spent decades tracking the lives and deaths of thousands of trees -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 4th
Physicist Erik Verlinde will discuss his and others’ groundbreaking gravitational theories during a live webcast tonight at 7 P.M. Eastern time -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 4th
Three scientists developed microscope methods that use electrons and cold temperature to reveal tiny details of life’s machinery -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 4th
Complex computer modeling demonstrates that obsessive-compulsive disorder patients learn about their environments but don’t use that information to guide their actions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 3rd
Fully opening this new window on the universe will take decades—even centuries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 3rd
Three physicists who lead the LIGO experiment, which made the first detection of gravitational waves, will share this year's award -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 2nd
A new study adds to findings that female children and adolescents are more susceptible to head injuries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 2nd
Three U.S. scientists share the 2017 award -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
October 2nd
The U.S.’s 1954 Castle Bravo thermonuclear disaster offers a cautionary tale about what could go wrong -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com