Oceanography Alert

 
EUREKA ALERT! - OCEANOGRAPHY
December 14th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak that revealed the western side of storm had moved into the southern and central Philippines. Infrared data revealed very cold cloud top temperatures with the potential for heavy rainfall.
December 14th
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) New work by Dr Michael Kelleher and Prof James Screen from the University of Exeter find evidence that sea ice change is both a driver of and a response to atmospheric variability.
December 13th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Storm Kai-tak developed near the east central Philippines as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed its rainfall.
December 13th
(Naval Research Laboratory) NRL COAMPS®-TC improves forecasts and evacuation correctness in both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and enhances the safety of US Navy ships, aircraft, and the civilian population.
December 12th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A developing area of tropical low pressure designated System 96W was affecting the central Philippines when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead.
December 12th
(Princeton University, Engineering School) For anyone who has marveled at the richly colored layers in a cafe latte, you're not alone. Princeton researchers, likewise intrigued, have now revealed how this tiered structure develops when espresso is poured into hot milk. Honing techniques for yielding sought-after layers by flowing liquids into each other could reduce costs and complexity in a range of applications.
December 12th
(University of South Florida (USF Health)) Instability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet signals increased risk of rising sea levels.
December 12th
(American Geophysical Union) New research shows human-induced climate change increased the amount and intensity of Hurricane Harvey's unprecedented rainfall. The new findings are being published in two separate studies and being presented in a press conference today at the 2017 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, along with additional new findings about recent Atlantic Ocean hurricanes.
December 11th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA analyzed the rainfall generated by short-lived Tropical Cyclone 04B that formed and faded over a day in the Bay of Bengal.
December 11th
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) Western North Pacific anomalous anticyclone (WNPAC, or referred to as Philippine Sea anomalous anticyclone) is the most important anomalous circulation pattern connecting El Niño and East Asian-western North Pacific monsoon. WNPAC persists from the El Niño mature winter to the following summer and thus is one of the most long-lasting anomalous circulation patterns over the entire tropical climate system. A new mechanism was proposed to explain the maintenance of the WNPAC, which was named as 'anomalous moist enthalpy advection mechanism.'
December 11th
(NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center) NOAA scientists studying sounds made by Atlantic cod and haddock at spawning sites in the Gulf of Maine have found that vessel traffic noise is reducing the distance over which these animals can communicate with each other. As a result, daily behavior, feeding, mating, and socializing during critical biological periods for these commercially and ecologically important fish may be altered, according to a study published in Nature Scientific Reports.
December 10th
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Three billion years ago, the sun shone weaker, but Earth stayed surprisingly warm. Carl Sagan thought a greenhouse effect must have been to thank. A model built on 359 chemical processes has finally arrived at scenarios with a reasonable chance of producing the needed methane on ancient Earth. The model has broad parameters in hope that it may someday be of use to interpret conditions on exoplanets.
December 10th
(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) It is known that the ice shelves surrounding the continent regulate the ice flow from the land into the ocean. Now scientists found that also melting near the fringes and in the midst of the ice shelves can have direct effects reaching very far inland. This could increase ice loss and hence sea-level rise.
December 10th
(University of Liverpool) Researchers from the University of Liverpool have spotted the equivalent of smoke-rings in the ocean which they think could 'suck up' small marine creatures and carry them at high speed and for long distances across the ocean.
December 10th
(Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) At the Fall 2017 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, scientists from around the world will present 19 talks and posters about the Coordinated Canyon Experiment -- the most extensive, long-term effort to monitor turbidity currents ever attempted. The results of this two-year project challenge existing paradigms about what causes turbidity currents, what they look like, and how they work.
December 10th
(University of Tasmania - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies) In a world-first, a research team of Australian and international scientists has used data collected by satellites and an ocean model to explain and predict biodiversity on the Antarctic seafloor.
December 10th
(University of Exeter) Hundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans and on beaches, including plastic 'six pack' holders and disgarded fishing gear.
December 9th
(National University of Singapore) An international team of marine researchers, led by Dr Neo Mei Lin and Associate Professor Peter Todd from the National University of Singapore, has recently published a comprehensive study on the status of giant clams worldwide.
December 7th
(University of California - Los Angeles) A new UCLA-led study brings together scientists from land hydrology, glaciology and climate modeling to unravel a meltwater mystery. UCLA professor of geography Laurence Smith and his team of researchers discovered that some meltwater from the lakes and rivers atop the region's glaciers, is being stored and trapped on top of the glacier inside a low-density, porous 'rotten ice.' This phenomenon affects climate model predictions of Greenland's meltwater.
December 7th
(University of Plymouth) A single plastic carrier bag could be shredded by marine organisms into 1.75 million microscopic fragments, according to new research published in Marine Pollution Bulletin and carried out by the University of Plymouth.