Oceanography Alert

 
EUREKA ALERT! - OCEANOGRAPHY
February 17th
(VVH Consulting) New research from scientists and economists at the University of California Santa Barbara, Oregon State University and Environmental Defense Fund identifies the dramatic future impacts of climate change on the world's fisheries and how fishing reforms are vital to sustaining the global seafood supply. Even in the face of climate change, the research (to be released at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 18) finds that the total amount of fish in the oceans globally and fishing profits would increase significantly through effective management.
February 17th
(VVH Consulting) New research finds that climate change will cause dramatic impacts in the world's fisheries, but with effective management most fisheries could yield more fish and more prosperity, even with a changing climate. Relative to today, this preliminary research illustrates that effective management reforms can lead, globally, to a nearly 90 percent increase in profits, a third more fish in the water and a more than 10 percent increase in harvest by 2100 in the face of climate change.
February 16th
(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) A panel of scholars including Stace Beaulieu, a deep-sea biologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), will discuss the pros and cons of deep-sea mining during the symposium, "Should We Mine the Seafloor?" scheduled on Saturday, February 18, at the AAAS meeting in Boston, MA. A news briefing for science journalists will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday, February 17, in room 103 of the Hynes Convention Center.
February 16th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA examined the heavy rainfall generated by Tropical Cyclone Dineo as it made landfall in Mozambique and NASA's Terra satellite spotted the storm's remnants over four countries.
February 16th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Satellite imagery captured the beginning of a chain of Eastern Pacific Ocean storms forecast to affect the US West Coast. A close-up satellite view show from Feb. 17 shows a large storm system affecting southern California, while a wider satellite view revealed a second storm system in the Central Pacific Ocean headed toward the east.
February 16th
(University of East Anglia) Local weather plays an important part in the retreat of the ice shelves in West Antarctica, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications.The study led by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) of the Pine Island Glacier (PIG) used a unique five-year record to study how the interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, as well as changing currents, control how heat is transported to, and beneath, the Pine Island Ice Shelf.
February 15th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a night-time view of former Tropical Cyclone Dineo over the southeastern coast of Mozambique. Warnings have already been posted in the northeastern region of South Africa as Dineo continues to track inland.
February 15th
(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) A free webinar for the shipping industry, fishing community and others interested in a new system that reveals where ships are most likely to encounter high densities of blue whales off the West Coast. The project funded by NASA and NOAA produces monthly maps of anticipated blue whale densities based on ocean conditions, which are regularly posted on NOAA Fisheries' West Coast Region website. The information is designed to help vessel crews and fishermen reduce the risk of ship strikes and entanglements.
February 14th
(University of Delaware) Based on data from the first UD ocean sensors deployed under Greenland's Petermann Glacier, UD researchers report that the floating ice shelf is strongly coupled, or tied, to the ocean below and to the adjacent Nares Strait. Warming temperatures recorded at the deepest ocean sensors match data from Nares Strait, which connects the Arctic and Atlantic oceans.
February 14th
(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) California sardine stocks famously crashed in John Steinbeck's 'Cannery Row.' New research, building on the pioneering work of Soutar and Isaacs in the late 1960s and others, shows in greater detail that such forage fish stocks have undergone boom-bust cycles for centuries, with at least three species off the US West Coast repeatedly experiencing steep population increases followed by declines long before commercial fishing began.
February 14th
(Wildlife Conservation Society) Scientists and government officials met at the United Nations today to consider possible solutions to a global problem: how to protect whale species in their most important marine habitats that overlap with shipping lanes vital to the economies of many of the world's nations.
February 14th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Dineo in the Mozambique Channel on Feb. 15, the storm was centered just off the coast of Mozambique and moving toward landfall.
February 14th
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) A new Berkeley Lab study shows that high-resolution models captured hurricanes and big waves that low-resolution ones missed. Better extreme wave forecasts are important for coastal cities, the military, the shipping industry, and surfers.
February 14th
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) The ongoing global change causes rising ocean temperatures and changes the ocean circulation. Therefore less oxygen is dissolved in surface waters and less oxygen is transported into the deep sea. This reduction of oceanic oxygen supply has major consequences for the organisms in the ocean. In the international journal Nature, oceanographers of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now published the most comprehensive analysis on oxygen loss in the world's oceans and their cause so far.
February 13th
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Last year's El Niño resulted in unprecedented erosion of the Pacific coastline, according to research by marine scientist David Hubbard.
February 13th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Terra satellite saw strong thunderstorms spiraling into the heart of Tropical Cyclone Dineo on Valentine's Day as it continued to strengthen in the Mozambique Channel.
February 13th
(University of California - Riverside) A new study by a team of researchers, including one from UC Riverside, found that the fault under Ventura, Calif., would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake and more damage than previously suspected. The Ventura-Pitas Point fault in Southern California has been the focus of much recent attention because it is thought to be capable of magnitude 8 earthquakes. It underlies the city of Ventura and runs offshore, and thus could generate tsunamis.
February 13th
(University of California - Irvine) Ice loss from Canada's Arctic glaciers has transformed them into a major contributor to sea level change, new research by University of California, Irvine glaciologists has found. From 2005 to 2015, surface melt off ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands grew by an astonishing 900 percent.
February 12th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Cyclone Carlos became sub-tropical and weakened to a remnant low pressure area over the weekend of Feb. 11-12. By Feb. 13, as NASA's Terra satellite passed over the remnants, the storm still showed a circulation center.
February 12th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The fifth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season formed today, Feb. 13 as NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of the storm.