Oceanography Alert

 
EUREKA ALERT! - OCEANOGRAPHY
April 23rd
(University of Stirling) The rapid decline of ancient ice sheets could help scientists predict the impact of modern-day climate and sea-level change, according to research by the universities of Stirling in Scotland and Tromsø in Norway.
April 21st
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) An animation created by NASA using imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite shows the North Atlantic Ocean's first tropical storm of the season being "eaten" by a large frontal system.
April 20th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The first tropical storm of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season formed 40 days before the official kick off of the season. Tropical Storm Arlene formed in the North Central Atlantic Ocean and NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided forecasters with a look at the storm, swirling far from land areas.
April 20th
(World Scientific) Professors Mortell and Seymour give a step-by-step synopsis of their forty-five years of research on nonlinear waves. This is the first book to systematically address propagation and reflection of nonlinear hyperbolic and dispersive waves in bounded and stratified media. Acoustic oscillations in shaped resonators and the sloshing of fluids in tanks are important physical problems examined in detail.
April 19th
(University of Georgia) Marine biologists James Hollibaugh and Sylvia Schaefer found that rising water temperatures could disrupt ocean food webs and lead to the release of more greenhouse gases.
April 19th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A low pressure area in the Atlantic Ocean, located southwest of the Azores was designated as Subtropical Depression One on April 19 as NASA examined its rainfall. By April 20 it had become the Atlantic's first tropical depression.
April 19th
(European Geosciences Union) In the first ecosystem-wide study of changing sea depths at five large coral reef tracts in Florida, the Caribbean and Hawai'i, researchers found the sea floor is eroding in all five places, and the reefs cannot keep pace with sea level rise. As a result, coastal communities protected by the reefs are facing increased risks from storms, waves and erosion. The study, by the US Geological Survey (USGS), is published today in Biogeosciences.
April 19th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spotted the remnants of Tropical Cyclone 02W southeast of Taiwan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as the system was dissipating.
April 18th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Terra satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Depression 02W as it continued to linger west of the northern Philippines on April 19.
April 18th
(University of South Florida (USF Health)) Researchers from the University of South Florida College of Marine Science played a key role in understanding the severity of the BP oil spill. They're now barcoding fish eggs to determine where fish are spawning, helping create protected areas and a baseline should another oil spill occur.
April 18th
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) The Arctic Ocean is a dead-end for plastics floating in the North Atlantic, a new study reports. The study confirms that plastics are abundant and widespread in seas east of Greenland and north of Scandinavia, even though human populations -- contributors of plastic waste -- are low there.
April 17th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The remnant clouds associated with former Tropical Cyclone 02W continued to linger in the South China Sea when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
April 17th
(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) The first genetic study of the diversity of clinging jellyfish populations around the globe has discovered some surprising links among distant communities of jellies and also revealed there may be more than one species of the infamous stinger. The paper published April 18 in the journal Peer J.
April 17th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Storm Maarutha became the first tropical cyclone of 2017 in the Bay of Bengal when it formed on April 15, 2017. Although the tropical cyclone only lived two days, NASA gathered rainfall rate data on it on the day it developed.
April 16th
(University of Utah Health) Our world seems to grow smaller by the day as biodiversity rapidly dwindles, but an international team of researchers discovered a never before studied giant, black, mud dwelling, worm-like animal.
April 16th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) On Saturday, April 15, Tropical Cyclone 1B formed in the Northern Indian Ocean and it made landfall in Burma (Myanmar) on April 16. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm as if formed quickly and strengthened into a tropical storm that was renamed 'Maarutha.'
April 16th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The remnants of former Tropical Depression 02W still lingered in the South China Sea when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on April 17.
April 16th
(University of Washington) Recent observations suggest less long-term warming, or climate sensitivity, than the predicted by climate models. But the mismatch is resolved by factoring in that Earth is still in the early stages of adjusting to greenhouse gases.
April 13th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Terra satellite passed over newly developed Tropical Depression 02W as it formed east of the central and southern Philippines in the Philippine Sea early on April 14.
April 13th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Two extra-tropical cyclones recently dropped very heavy rain over New Zealand, Debbie and Cook. As Cook's remnants continue to move away, NASA analyzed the heavy rainfall generated from the double extra-tropical punch.