Oceanography Alert

 
EUREKA ALERT! - OCEANOGRAPHY
March 21st
(National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center) Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff.The findings are published in the journal Nature on March 22.
March 19th
(NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research) Dikes could be lower if they are protected against the waves by grassy marshes. But the protective salt marsh grass is struggling, not only due to increasingly stronger waves, but also to the superfood diet of ragworms. These sophisticated gardeners turn inedible, tough grass seeds into succulent, nutritious sprouts in their burrows. These cultivation techniques prevent many seeds from growing into salt marsh vegetation, thus undermining the use of salt marshes for 'natural' coastal protection.
March 15th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Ex-tropical cyclone 11S was still generating some heavy rainfall, despite losing its tropical status and becoming a sub-tropical storm when the GPM core satellite passed overhead. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the remnant low pressure area and analyzed the rain the system was generating.
March 15th
(Carnegie Institution for Science) Rock samples from northeastern Canada retain chemical signals that help explain what Earth's crust was like more than 4 billion years ago, reveals new work from Carnegie's Richard Carlson and Jonathan O'Neil of the University of Ottawa.
March 15th
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Marine biologists quantify the carbon consumption of bacterioplankton to better understand the ocean carbon cycle.
March 14th
(University of Washington) A properly-managed subsistence harvest of polar bears can continue under climate change, according to analysis that combines sea-ice forecasts with a polar bear population model.
March 14th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Once a tropical storm, now a sub-tropical storm, the remnants of the tropical low pressure area formerly known as 11S was spotted by NASA's Aqua satellite, still spinning in the Southern Indian Ocean.
March 14th
(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) Polar cod fulfill a key role in the Arctic food web, as they are a major source of food for seals, whales and seabirds alike. But the polar cod themselves might soon be the hungry ones.
March 14th
(ETH Zurich) Microscopic marine plankton are not helplessly adrift in the ocean. They can perceive cues that indicate turbulence, rapidly respond to regulate their behavior and actively adapt. ETH researchers have demonstrated for the first time how they do this .
March 13th
(University of Wyoming) Barbara John and her husband, Michael Cheadle, both UW professors of geology and geophysics, recently co-led a research expedition aboard the US Research Vessel Atlantis. With the aid of two small submarines tasked with exploring and sampling the sea floor, the group located five new hydrothermal vents, as well as two others that were last seen 23 years ago, at Pito Seamount in the Pacific Ocean.
March 13th
(GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre) GRACE began with a radical idea. Principal investigator Byron Tapley (University of Texas Center for Space Research) said, 'The completely new idea about GRACE was the perception that measuring and tracking mass gives you a way to probe the Earth system.' Measuring changes in mass has been a key to discovering how water and the solid Earth are changing deep underground in places humans can't go and can't see.
March 13th
(California Institute of Technology) A new study suggests that efficient nutrient consumption by plankton in the Southern Ocean drove carbon sequestration in the deep ocean during the ice ages.
March 12th
(Rutgers University) A new study from a Coastal Waters Consortium team of researchers led by Rutgers University postdoctoral researcher, Michael McCann, has found which birds, fish, insects and other animals affected by the Deepwater Horizon explosion should be given top priority for conservation, protection and research.
March 12th
(University of California - Santa Barbara) A new study finds that humans can interact with sharks without long-term behavioral impacts for the ocean's top predators.
March 12th
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) The new study allows a more accurate assessment of how much heat has accumulated in the ocean (and Earth) system. It will be a valuable resource for future studies of oceanic variability and its climatic impacts on both regional and global scales.
March 12th
(University of Washington) The dramatic decline of Arctic sea ice in recent decades is caused by a mixture of global warming and a natural, decades-long atmospheric hot spot over Greenland and the Canadian Arctic.
March 12th
(University of Sydney) University of Sydney research has revealed high quality surf breaks boost economic growth in nearby areas. Researchers analyzed satellite images of nighttime lights as a 'proxy' for economic growth and found that a surfing community's discovery of a high-quality break can raise growth by 2.2 percentage points a year. The study of more than 5,000 surf break locations in 146 countries spans data between 1992 and 2013, with a concentration toward breaks in Australia and the United States.
March 12th
(University of Southampton) Boaty McBoatface is joining ocean scientists from the University of Southampton and British Antarctic Survey on an expedition to study some of the deepest and coldest abyssal ocean waters on Earth -- known as Antarctic Bottom Water -- and how they affect climate change.
March 12th
(James Cook University) A James Cook University scientist has discovered why there was an unprecedented dieback of mangroves in the Gulf of Carpentaria in early 2016 -- the plants died of thirst.
March 9th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Cyclone 11S appeared elongated in NASA satellite imagery as a result of the storm being battered by wind shear.