Oceanography Alert

 
EUREKA ALERT! - OCEANOGRAPHY
October 18th
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) 'The autonomous HydroCamel II integrates state-of-the-art technologies, including high-level maneuvering in six degrees of freedom and an ability to dive almost vertically,' says Professor Hugo Guterman of the BGU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and head of LAR. 'Until now, these capabilities were limited to remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs), which must be tethered by an umbilical cable to a host ship for its power and air source. The HydroCamel II is completely autonomous.'
October 18th
(Springer) The Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) has chosen Springer's Encyclopedia of Marine Geosciences as the winner of the society's annual award for an outstanding geoscience research resource. The award will be presented on 23 October 2017 during the Geological Society of America's (GSA) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Seattle.
October 18th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Depression 26W formed early on Oct. 19 and by late morning the storm was already coming unraveled in NASA satellite imagery.
October 18th
(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) Hans Joachim Schellnhuber is the Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), a member of the Leibniz Association. The Blue Planet Prize honors outstanding thinkers who help to meet challenges of planetary dimensions. It is awarded by the Asahi Glass Foundation and handed over in presence of Japan's Imperial Prince and Princess. Schellnhuber received the prize for establishing a new field of science, Earth System Analysis, and introducing most influential concepts including the notion of tipping elements in the climate system.
October 18th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided 3-D data that showed intensifying Typhoon Lan had powerful thunderstorms stretching high into the troposphere. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image Typhoon Lan that showed the well-developed circulation.
October 18th
(University of Helsinki) Warmer ocean surface triggered the ice retreat during The Younger Dryas.
October 18th
(Rice University) Scientists from Rice University and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi's Harte Research Institute have discovered that Earth's sea level did not rise steadily when the planet's glaciers last melted during a period of global warming; rather, sea level rose sharply in punctuated bursts.
October 18th
(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) Environmental disturbances such as El Niño shake up the marine food web off Southern California, new research shows, countering conventional thinking that the hierarchy of who-eats-who in the ocean remains largely constant over time.
October 16th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Storm Lan was getting stronger as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
October 16th
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Every year, millions of tonnes of plastic debris ends up in the sea. The path taken by plastic to reach the sea must be elucidated before it will be possible to reduce the volume of plastic input. To date, there was only little information available on this. It has now been followed up by an interdisciplinary research team who were able to show that plastic debris is primarily carried into the sea by large rivers.
October 15th
(University of Portsmouth) Surprisingly low concentrations of toxic chemicals -- from fungicides to antidepressants -- can change the way some aquatic creatures swim and feed, according to new research. In addition, depending on the cocktail of toxins they can produce unexpected results.
October 15th
(University of Manchester) Whales and dolphins (cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects -- much like human societies. A major new study, published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution, has linked the complexity of Cetacean culture and behavior to the size of their brains.
October 15th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible picture of newly formed Tropical Storm Lan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
October 15th
(King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)) Microbes are dispersed widely over the oceans with islands acting as stepping-stones to help transport of land-based organisms.
October 15th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Khanun after it had passed over southern China and began dissipating in the Gulf of Tonkin.
October 15th
(University of Utah) In a study published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth, scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals in lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. And as a small, constant source of seismic energy in the surrounding earth, lake microseisms can shine a light on the geology surrounding a lake.
October 15th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a thermal view of the clouds in hurricane Ophelia as it lashed Ireland. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite provided a look at the rainfall that was affecting the Emerald Isle.
October 12th
(NOAA Headquarters) Scientists recently discovered that some jellyfish in the Bay are quite different from their ocean cousins. This led scientists from NOAA and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History to declare them as two different species.
October 12th
(Cardiff University) Scientists have shown that ocean clams and worms are releasing a significant amount of potentially harmful greenhouse gas into the atmosphere.
October 12th
(Aarhus University) For the first time, ocean data from Northeast Greenland reveals the long-term impact of the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. The observed increase in freshwater content will affect the conditions in all Greenland fjords and may ultimately affect the global ocean currents that keep Europe warm.