Oceanography Alert

 
EUREKA ALERT! - OCEANOGRAPHY
June 25th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The fourth tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed on June 25 and by June 26 it was already a hurricane. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Dora on June 25 when it was a tropical storm and the next day it became the first hurricane of the season.
June 25th
(University of Zurich) Over two million years ago, a third of the largest marine animals like sharks, whales, sea birds and sea turtles disappeared. This previously unknown extinction event not only had a consid-erable impact on the earth's historical biodiversity but also on the functioning of ecosystems. This has been demonstrated by researchers at the University of Zurich.
June 25th
(Duke University) Biodiversity losses from deep-sea mining are unavoidable and possibly irrevocable, an international team of scientists, economists and lawyers argue. They say the International Seabed Authority, which is responsible for regulating undersea mining in areas outside national jurisdictions, must recognize the risk and communicate it clearly to member states and the public to spur discussions as to whether deep-seabed mining should proceed, and if so, what safeguards are needed to minimize biodiversity loss.
June 25th
(University of British Columbia) Industrial fishing fleets dump nearly 10 million tons of good fish back into the ocean every year, according to Sea Around Us research.
June 22nd
(University of Tasmania - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies) Marine seismic surveys used in petroleum exploration could cause a two to three-fold increase in mortality of adult and larval zooplankton, new research published in leading science journal Nature Ecology and Evolution has found. Scientists from IMAS and the Centre for Marine Science and Technology (CMST) at Curtin University studied the impact of commercial seismic surveys on zooplankton populations by carrying out tests using seismic air guns in the ocean off Southern Tasmania.
June 22nd
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical storm Cindy was downgraded to a tropical depression after moving onshore near the Texas and Louisiana Border on Thursday June 22, 2017 and bringing a lot of rain with it. That rainfall was measured by NASA using satellite data.
June 22nd
(University of Plymouth) The causes of falling sea levels in the Dead Sea, which have significant impacts on the environment and the economy, are to be investigated in new research led by the University of Plymouth.
June 21st
(Louisiana State University) Enhancing sediment retention of diversions and improving flood-risk assessment are among the 13 studies recently funded through the first round of Louisiana's RESTORE Act Center of Excellence grant process. LSU faculty led eight of the 13 funded projects.
June 21st
(Geological Society of America) Registration is open for The Geological Society of America's Annual Meeting & Exposition, to be held Oct. 22-25 2017 at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, Washington, USA.
June 21st
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Cindy in infrared light to identify areas of strongest storms and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite found locations of heaviest rainfall as Cindy was making landfall along the US Gulf Coast states.
June 20th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Cindy after it formed and was already affecting the US Gulf Coast states. Cindy continues to crawl toward land and Tropical Storm warnings are in effect for June 21.
June 20th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Storm Bret was weakening with NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on June 20, and within three hours of the overpass, Bret degenerated into a tropical wave.
June 20th
(Swansea University) This research suggests that that warmer temperatures associated with climate change may lead to higher numbers of female sea turtles and increased nest failure.
June 19th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over a developing low pressure area in the Gulf of Mexico and gathered two days of rainfall and storm height information. The disturbance could become Tropical or Sub-tropical Storm Cindy in the next couple days.
June 19th
(University of Gothenburg) The University of Gothenburg soon will have its first autonomous underwater vehicle for research use. This will make it possible to conduct detailed studies of the seabed at great depths and track the climate thousands of years back in time.
June 19th
(American Institute of Physics) Waves deep within the ocean play an important role in establishing ocean circulation, arising when tidal currents oscillate over an uneven ocean bottom. The internal waves generated by this process stir and mix the ocean, bringing cold, deep water to the surface to be warmed by the sun. This week in Physics of Fluids, investigators how to tell which way internal waves will go. The proposed theory unifies several previously understood explanations of wave propagation.
June 18th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA provided rainfall data and cloud height information to the forecasters monitoring the developing Tropical Cyclone 2 in the western Atlantic Ocean. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the organizing storm on June 19. The storm has already generated a number of warnings and watches in the Caribbean and Venezuela.
June 18th
(University of California - San Diego) A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has identified for the first time what drives the observed differences in the chemical make-up of sea spray particles ejected from the ocean by breaking waves.
June 18th
(Cardiff University) Scientists believe they have discovered the reason behind mysterious changes to the climate that saw temperatures fluctuate by up to 15°C within just a few decades during the ice age periods.
June 14th
(University of California - San Diego) The West Antarctic Ice Sheet, a landbound mass of ice larger than Mexico, experienced substantial surface melt through the austral summer of 2015-2016 during one of the largest El Niño events of the past 50 years, according to scientists who had been conducting the first comprehensive atmospheric measurements in the region since the 1960s.