Oceanography Alert

 
EUREKA ALERT! - OCEANOGRAPHY
May 21st
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Over the week of May 15, extreme rainfall drenched northeastern Australia and NASA data provided a look at the record totals.
May 16th
(University of Waterloo) Water reservoirs created by damming rivers could have significant impacts on the world's carbon cycle and climate system that aren't being accounted for, a new study concludes.
May 16th
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) About half of atmospheric carbon dioxide is fixed by ocean's phytoplankton through a process called photosynthesis. A large portion of biologically fixed carbon is formed by picocyanobacteria at the sea surface and then transported to the deep ocean. But what remains a mystery is how colored dissolved organic matter which originates from plant detritus (either on land or at sea) makes it into the deep ocean. A team of scientists has potentially found a viable marine source of this colored material.
May 15th
(Oregon State University) The rare but spectacular eruptions of supervolcanoes can cause massive destruction and affect climate patterns on a global scale for decades -- and a new study has found that these sites also may experience ongoing, albeit smaller eruptions for tens of thousands of years after.
May 15th
(University of California - Davis) The chemistry of shells of plankton called foraminifera are a record of past climate. Recent experiments led by UC Davis scientists show magnesium levels vary in foram shells due to different growth rates during daily light/dark cycles.
May 15th
(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Marine reserves -- sections of the ocean where fishing is prohibited -- promote coral reef sustainability by preventing overfishing and increasing fish abundance and diversity. But to be effective, they need to be sized right, and in a way that accounts for how far juvenile fish travel away from their parents after spawning.
May 14th
(Pensoft Publishers) Cultural ecosystem services reflect physical and cognitive interactions between humans and nature, and are increasingly recognised for providing experiences, capabilities and many other benefits to human societies. While oceans, seas, and coasts sustain a great proportion of the human population, cultural ecosystem services provided by these areas still remain largely unexplored. A new study published in the open access journal One Ecosystem analyses and maps case studies worldwide and pinpoints priorities to move research forward.
May 14th
(University of Tasmania - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies) The beaches of one of the world's most remote islands have been found to be polluted with the highest density of plastic debris reported anywhere on the planet, in a study published in the prestigious US scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Despite being uninhabited and located more than 5,000 kilometers from the nearest major population center, Henderson Island is littered with an estimated 37.7 million pieces of plastic.
May 14th
(University of California - San Diego) A new study suggests that an aggressive reef competitor -- the Threespot Damselfish -- may have impeded the recovery of Caribbean long-spined sea urchin populations after a mysterious disease outbreak caused a massive die-off of these animals over three decades ago.
May 14th
(University of New South Wales) Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science have modelled how extremes in precipitation, drought, extreme heat and ocean temperatures will change in Australia at global temperatures 1.5°C and 2°C above pre-industrial conditions. It doesn't bode well for Australia's Great Barrier Reef.
May 14th
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) Scientists from the CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics investigated the impact of Ural blocking (UB) on Eurasian extreme cold events in response to Arctic warming and obtained some interesting findings.
May 11th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Cyclone Ella is intensifying and NASA observed heavy rainfall in the storm. Ella is now expected to pass to the north of Fiji which is good news for the island nation.
May 11th
(Royal Astronomical Society) Planet walks and planetaria in Galway, tactile stargazing for people with sight loss, adventures in space for girls, astronomy and geophysics for rehabilitation of prisoners, and a science trailer for Cornwall make up five new public engagement projects supported by more than £400,000 from the Royal Astronomical Society. The projects, backed by the RAS 200: Sky & Earth program that celebrates the run up to the Society's bicentenary in 2020, were announced today (Friday, May 12) at the RAS AGM in London.
May 11th
(University of Exeter) Dramatic drops in oceanic oxygen, which cause mass extinctions of sea life, come to a natural end -- but it takes about a million years.
May 11th
(Geological Society of America) Geoscientists from the North American Cordilleran region will convene in Honolulu, Hawai'i, on May 23-25, to discuss new science, expand on existing science, and explore the unique geologic features of the region. Topics include hazards, geoarchaeology, water resources and water quality, geothermal exploration, and the application of emerging technologies to the geosciences. The meeting will also address the geology of Mars and volcanism on other planets.
May 10th
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Glaciers around the world are disappearing before our eyes, and the implications for people are wide-ranging and troubling, Twila Moon, a glacier expert at the University of Colorado Boulder, concludes in a Perspectives piece in the journal Science today.
May 10th
(National Science Foundation) Researchers have discovered for the first time that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that specialize in the production of toxic compounds nearly identical to man-made fire retardants, a finding that could help scientists better understand the human health implications of these common additives.
May 10th
(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) By the second half of this century, rising air temperatures above the Weddell Sea could set off a self-amplifying meltwater feedback cycle under the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, ultimately causing the second-largest ice shelf in the Antarctic to shrink dramatically.
May 10th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The first tropical storm of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season was already losing steam when the Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead the day it formed. By the next day, May 11, Tropical Storm Adrian weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
May 10th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Cyclone Donna was one of the most powerful out-of-season tropical cyclones ever recorded in the southern hemisphere and generated extreme amounts of rainfall along its path. NASA analyzed and mapped rainfall totals generated by the storm.