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LA Times Science News
January 17th
Health experts have an intriguing suggestion for reducing opioid overdoses and deaths — asking doctors to prescribe bigger doses of the powerful painkillers. It may sound counterintuitive, but providing more pain relief to patients right away might…
January 17th
The country that put the starch in “stiff upper lip” has made companionship, conversation and human contact a national priority. On Wednesday, British Prime Minister Theresa May announced the creation of a new ministerial portfolio in her Cab…
January 17th
After nearly four decades of rising body weights in the United States and across the world, medical experts are still casting about for the best way to treat obesity and the diseases that come with it. The answer may depend on which contributes more impo…
January 17th
A team of Chinese, American and Belgian scientists have unearthed a 161-million-year-old dinosaur fossil showing that the animal may have had vibrant, iridescent plumage like that of peacocks and other birds today. The fossil of the dazzling dinosaur, de…
January 16th
Bariatric surgery has become the medical profession’s go-to solution for meaningful weight loss, and new research shows why: It saves lives. In a retrospective study of close to 34,000 Israeli patients with obesity, the 8,385 who got one of three s…
January 15th
A high-salt diet may spell trouble for the brain — and for mental performance — even if it doesn’t push blood pressure into dangerous territory, new research has found. A new study has shown that in mice fed a very high-salt diet, blood…
January 12th
In April 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown called on the people of the most populous state to reduce their water use by 25% in response to a punishing four-year drought. It was an audacious goal, and Californians came close to meeting it. Between June 2015 and Apri…
January 12th
Santa Barbara County crews worked through the holidays to defend coastal communities from the second half of Southern California's familiar cycle of fire and flood. They cleaned out the 11 debris basins that dot the Santa Barbara front country, making ro…
January 11th
If future astronauts need to mine water on Mars, they may not even have to dig. Thanks to erosion wearing away the Martian surface, scientists using NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have spotted thick deposits of ice in the planet’s mid-lat…
January 11th
Good news, urbanites! New research suggests that you don’t have to leave the city to reap some of the benefits of being in nature. Simply listening to the chirping of birds, glimpsing the sky and even noticing a scrawny city tree can boost your men…
January 10th
Astronomers watching a fast radio burst flashing from more than 3 billion light-years away say that its source lies in an extreme environment with a powerful magnetic field — perhaps a supermassive black hole, or the remains of a supernova. The fin…
January 10th
A little exposure to armed conflict can lead to a lot of problems for wild animals like elephants, lions, giraffes and other large mammals, new research shows.
January 9th
To the roughly 400 clinical trials that have tested some experimental treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and come up short, we can now add three more. An experimental drug called idalopirdine failed to help people with mild to moderate Alzheimer&rsq…
January 9th
Clifford Johnson wants you to talk about physics. That goes for everyone, even those of us who can't tell a neutron from a neutrino.
January 8th
“It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words,” George Orwell writes in the fifth chapter of his dystopian novel, “1984.” Four public health experts from Emory University in Atlanta, just a stone’s throw from the C…
January 8th
It’s no surprise that the United States ranks absolutely last in child mortality among the world’s wealthiest countries — that’s been true for years. A new study examines how this sad situation came to be. According to data from t…
January 8th
The year 2017 was the third-warmest on record for the United States, and featured a pileup of weather and climate disasters that cost the nation a record-breaking $306 billion, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
January 8th
Witches continue to work their dark arts in some parts of the world, at least in the minds of their accusers. For example, in a rural farming community in southwestern China, 13.7% of the population has been labeled “zhu” or “witch&rdqu…
January 6th
There are two things working against the Trump administration’s proposal to open up California coastal waters to new oil and gas drilling: state regulators and simple economics. California has powerful legal tools to head off new offshore developme…
January 5th
Is it too late to get a flu shot? Health experts agree that the answer is no.
January 5th
They say you can’t judge a book by its cover, but humans can judge whether another person is sick by looking at a photo for just a few seconds. That may not sound remarkable — until you consider that the sick people in the photos were in the …
January 5th
The newly resurgent field of gene therapy, which recently produced treatments for blood cancers and blindness, has taken a step toward fighting a scourge that is on the rise worldwide: diabetes. In research reported Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell…
January 4th
When Mr. Rogers told viewers of his beloved children’s TV show to “look for the helpers,” bonobos clearly weren’t paying attention. A new study of one of our closest living relatives finds that these docile apes prefer individuals…
January 3rd
Two bacterial strains that have plagued hospitals around the country may have been at least partly fueled by a sugar additive in our food products, scientists say. Trehalose, a sugar that is added to a wide range of food products, could have allowed cert…
January 3rd
The DNA of an infant who died 11,500 years ago in present-day Alaska reveals that she was born into a previously unknown population of pioneers who were among the first to arrive in North America.