NY Times Science

 
March 22nd
A lower-cost vaccine provides strong protection against rotavirus, a diarrheal disease, and could be particularly useful in poorer countries, researchers said.
March 22nd
Dr. J. Mario Molina, one of the few insurance executives to criticize the House bill publicly, says it could harm insurers and patients alike.
March 22nd
Much of the ice also appears to be thinner than normal — further signs of climate change’s effects on the region.
March 22nd
A group of researchers created a ruse to draw attention to the seamy side of open-access journals, some of which will publish just about anything for a fee.
March 22nd
A Ph.D candidate and a computer program that took five minutes to run may upend the dinosaur classification system that has been used for more than a century.
March 22nd
The president’s stance on science funding could have serious consequences.
March 21st
The problem is more likely to occur with textured implants than with smooth implants, the F.D.A. said, and it is usually treatable and not often fatal.
March 21st
When the winter tide goes out on a northern Canadian bay, some Inuit clamber into the ice caves below to harvest fresh food.
March 21st
The White House is preparing to dismantle major policy actions of the Obama era, including a plan to close hundreds of heavily polluting power plants.
March 21st
“Sheefs” will test the limits of current regulations, experts say, as embryolike structures are created directly from stem cells.
March 20th
The introduction of a new class of cholesterol drugs led some experts to believe that we might be able to virtually eliminate heart attacks. But it hasn’t worked out that way.
March 20th
Even fully fledged chicks will hound their parents for food, researchers find.
March 20th
Researchers hope a study will shed some light on a cancer treatment, using radiation, that is growing in popularity and surrounded by questions.
March 20th
Since 2001 the number of grandparents has grown by 24 percent, partly as a result of the aging of the baby boom generation.
March 20th
Once a breakfast staple, this white, seed-packed variety of the fruit has all but disappeared. Yet there are hints of a small-scale revival.
March 20th
Scientists disagree about whether bringing extinct species back from the dead will result in a net loss of global biodiversity.
March 17th
Flowering plants that are blue are rare in nature. But Texas bluebonnets put on an annual show in pastures, parks and highway medians.
March 17th
In general, the large size of some prehistoric animals in comparison to their modern counterparts had to do with evolutionary opportunity.
March 17th
Films of the tests conducted in Nevada and the Marshall Islands from 1945 to 1962 are being restored and released to the public.
March 17th
Thousands of films showing U.S. atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962 have been declassified. Scientists are studying them and posting them for all to see.
March 17th
Much of the agency’s state-level work would be eliminated or sharply reduced by President Trump’s proposed budget, which cuts the E.P.A. more than any other agency.
March 17th
Patients who took the drug, Repatha, were significantly less likely to have heart attacks or strokes, researchers concluded. But its high cost will be an issue.
March 16th
After contracting a rare case of the mumps as an adult, a man receives bad news about his fertility.
March 16th
Scientists expressed alarm at the depth of proposed cuts to climate change, medical and energy programs, saying they threaten the nation’s research infrastructure.
March 16th
A study led by Penn State researchers found more evidence of the relationship between nose shape and the climate where a person’s ancestors lived.
March 16th
Researchers develop a model they hope can be used to understand how dolphins and whales react physiologically to threats from predators and people.
March 16th
The microscopic animals were found to produce a unique protein that coats the molecules in their cells in a glasslike substance.