NY Times Science

 
February 18th
The company may try again as soon as Sunday to launch the rocket, which carries materials for the space station.
February 18th
The politicians who not only write laws but also break them know the ins and outs of the tax system. Why not study their examples for a little smart advice?
February 18th
A nuclear renaissance fizzles as costs soar, green energy makes gains and regulatory pain rises.
February 17th
The country's missile test this month gave weapons monitors a status report on the progress of North Korea's nuclear program. They said there was a significant advance.
February 17th
Work has stopped temporarily at the government lab handling viruses like Ebola because air hoses used in safety suits were not tested for breathing safety.
February 17th
The illustrations of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the father of modern neuroscience, are featured in the new book “The Beautiful Brain.”
February 17th
Some researchers think turtles evolved the ability to retract and then stretch their necks to snatch prey, not defend themselves in their shells.
February 17th
A free math camp for middle-school students from New York’s poorest neighborhoods was an effort to increase the number of blacks and Latinos with advanced math degrees.
February 16th
At the onset of World War II, he took the time to write a scientific paper about the probability of life elsewhere in the universe.
February 16th
Employees of the Environmental Protection Agency are calling their senators to try to defeat Scott Pruitt’s confirmation to run the agency.
February 16th
Federal support for science has been getting leaner as countries in Europe and Asia have been ramping up research spending.
February 16th
A teenager’s fossil hunt two decades ago may have changed paleontologists’ understanding of how long it took to recover from the “Great Dying” 252 million years ago.
February 16th
An ecological cornerstone is vanishing rapidly from the oceans, and scientists fear the consequences for climate change, fisheries and disease.
February 15th
The ruling gives the Broad Institute the potentially lucrative rights, a blow to the University of California, often said to be the birthplace of the technique.
February 15th
The agency’s acting administrator offered the first hints of a notable mission that could lead to a return to the moon in the Trump era.
February 15th
The country nearly tripled the previous record of 37, set by Russia, establishing itself as a major player in the growing market for surveillance and communication.
February 14th
The chip giant is ending its support of the fairs and sponsoring newer events like homemade engineering contests. Critics say the traditional fairs are as vital as ever.
February 14th
Pressed by controversial, advancing technology, an influential committee laid out the conditions under which human embryos might be engineered with heritable traits.
February 14th
Pilotless drones, capable of carrying one passenger and a small suitcase, are set to begin buzzing above the United Arab Emirates city as early as July.
February 14th
By scanning pottery from the Iron Age kingdom of Judah, geoscientists detected a spike and then a decline in the planet’s magnetic field starting in the eighth century B.C.
February 14th
Just like hangover cures, there are many theories about the best method for keeping cut flowers fresh. Here’s what you need to know.
February 14th
When some climate scientists began saying we’d entered a new epoch, they meant to draw attention to human effects on climate. Now, to their dismay, it’s become a tech call to arms for more disruption.
February 14th
American scientists should learn from their northern neighbors. Reject interference. Stay vigilant. Stay scientists.
February 13th
Excavators and dump trucks moved over 200 decomposing carcasses of pilot whales away from the coastline. Gas buildup in the carcasses risked explosions.
February 13th
A national physicians’ group says back pain is treated best by exercise, massage therapy or yoga and over-the-counter pain relievers, not medications like opioids.
February 13th
The species native to Cambodia’s limestone karsts exist nowhere else. Now these unique environments are being pulverized for cement.
February 13th
Almost half of these people were not diagnosed with any mood, chronic pain or sleep problem, researchers reported in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.
February 13th
A protein scaffold in the body of the hydra, a tiny predator, helps it regenerate a whole animal from even a small piece.
February 13th
The tiny hydra, a relative of jellyfish and a favorite in school biology labs, can regrow a whole animal from a piece, partly because even small remnants contain part of a protein scaffold that guides development.