NY Times Science

 
June 26th
Dr. Sarno was both hailed and dismissed for his contention that most chronic pain could be traced to deep within the psyche.
June 26th
Slow and steady, learns Federico Rios Escobar, isn’t just great advice for composing an image; it’s also an appealing state of mind.
June 26th
Excess heat in Phoenix grounded more than 40 flights in recent days, and scientists say a warming climate could also mean more turbulent rides.
June 26th
Thousands of patients may receive incorrect cancer diagnoses each year because of biopsy mix-ups. New technology can help prevent the mistakes — if pathologists adopt it.
June 26th
While bacteria have long been associated with disorders like acne and eczema, scientists are now fighting back with friendly members of the skin’s microbiome.
June 26th
Deer and elk are dying from chronic wasting disease in growing numbers. Burning the land may be the only way to turn back the disease.
June 26th
Sexual activity declined among adolescents in the 1990s, and rates have remained low. Still, teenagers in the United States are more likely to become pregnant than those in other western countries.
June 26th
Scientists are concerned over the cause of the rapid rise, which may indicate the world’s natural sponges that absorb carbon dioxide have changed.
June 26th
All the planets in the solar system interact gravitationally with the sun, but Jupiter’s great mass makes this interaction visible.
June 25th
Mr. Burstein was one of the first scientists to use lasers to do research on semiconductors and insulators, and held patents for a method to increase the semiconducting capacity of silicon.
June 25th
The neurologist Jay Lombard discusses the brain and its connection to what he describes as our deeper, spiritual underpinnings.
June 23rd
Republicans say a new health law would make it easier and more affordable to get care. But the opposite may be true.
June 23rd
Canada, Portugal, London: How the fire expertise of our Phoenix bureau chief informs our global reporting.
June 23rd
After decades of study, scientists have developed a model to explain how violent solar spicules form.
June 23rd
Historical observations of bright nights that were almost like daytime have a new explanation in forces of the upper atmosphere.
June 23rd
A chapter on evolution will no longer appear in ninth graders’ textbooks because it is considered too “controversial” an idea, an education official said.
June 22nd
A carbon trading program is shaping up as a big policy retort to President Trump’s decision to quit the Paris accord. But getting local industries on board will be a challenge.
June 22nd
The case of Exondys 51 poses emotionally charged issues for families of young boys with a rare illness, who are fighting companies to get coverage for an expensive drug approved on a lower bar of proof.
June 22nd
Nicolas is 14 and has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which is robbing him of his muscles — and his life. A new and expensive drug may help, but can he get it?
June 22nd
Scott Hamilton Kennedy’s documentary gives G.M.O. opponents their say, but leaves the last word to food technologists, who insist on reviewing the data.
June 22nd
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been taking images of the rover about every three months to monitor the surrounding area for changes.
June 22nd
In the most comprehensive study of egg shapes to date, scientists say that the best predictor of long or pointy eggs is a bird’s flying ability.
June 22nd
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced on Thursday that the bear, which has been on the endangered species list since 1975, was thriving in the region.
June 22nd
Mr. Leboyer, a French physician, advocated natural birth methods that focused on easing suffering for the baby.
June 21st
Dr. Weed created a system for organizing medical data that is used all over the world, and helped develop a computerized method for aiding diagnosis and treatment.
June 21st
Let’s take a moment to appreciate what causes the phenomenon of rain falling at the same time that the sun is shining.
June 21st
Mr. Nelson’s design, made decades after the size limit was thought to have been reached, allowed scientists to peer farther into the universe than ever before.
June 21st
One of Canada’s remaining igloo builders teaches the disappearing technique that was once common knowledge among the Inuit people.
June 20th
A draft of an executive order obtained by The Times appears to give the drug industry what it wants with no guarantee that consumer costs will fall.
June 20th
The scientific start to summer in the Northern Hemisphere this week comes ahead of a total solar eclipse in August, when the moon will engulf the sun.
June 20th
A land-based vacation in the Galápagos offers snorkeling, cave exploration, mountain hikes, tortoises and, sometimes, a little mystery.
June 19th
The company is joining other oil companies and corporate giants to endorse a plan from the Climate Leadership Council to tax fossil fuels and pay the dividends to taxpayers.
June 19th
Setting the stage for the next chapter in the quest to end cosmic loneliness, astronomers released a list of objects they are 90 percent sure are planets orbiting other stars.