NPR Environment

 
NPR ENVIRONMENT NEWS
April 24th
In order to investigate how eating fish affects our health as well as the oceans, author and fisherman Paul Greenberg spent a year eating fish every day.
April 24th
A technology competition seeks solutions to Lake Erie's biggest problems, including harmful algae blooms and aging water systems. Teams in cities around the region are competing for thousands of dollars in prize money and consulting services to create apps and other tools.
April 24th
As more homeowners install solar they're using less energy from their utilities, which in turn hurts their business. One utility in Colorado has forged a deal that may be a model for other states.
April 23rd
This weeks #NPRpoetry Twitter submissions celebrate Mother Earth.
April 23rd
Digesters convert livestock manure into electricity. Farmers can use it to power their operations or even sell some back to the grid. But some have found the technology too pricey to maintain.
April 23rd
Nomadic herders who live across West Africa are having to travel further and further south for their cows to graze. Some are letting cows graze on cropland, leading to deadly conflicts with farmers.
April 22nd
Thousands of scientists and their supporters took to the streets to advocate for public support for science and technology today in Washington, D.C., and other cities around the country.
April 22nd
"The Science Guy" dons his lab coat and bow tie uniform yet again, this time, in a a new political context. In his new Netflix series, Nye tackles climate change deniers and beyond.
April 22nd
Psychologists say anxiety over climate change is making some people feel overwhelmed. To talk through their worries, a group in Utah is meeting weekly and the idea has drawn interest in other states.
April 22nd
The foods we choose to put on our plates — or toss away – could have more of an ecological impact than many of us realize.
April 21st
A March for Science will be held Saturday in Washington, D.C., and hundreds of other cities in the U.S. Organizers say the march is a non-partisan celebration of science. It's meant to both encourage political leaders to fund science and rely on scientific evidence when making policy decisions. Critics worry the march will turn into an anti-Trump rally and paint scientists as just another interest group.
April 21st
The country's National Grid announced Friday it was on its way to a full day without requiring its coal plants to produce power. Britain plans to eliminate the energy source by 2025.
April 21st
No, say food safety experts. Molds can easily penetrate deep into a soft food, like bread. But you can salvage other foods with tougher surfaces, like cabbages, carrots and hard cheeses.
April 21st
One topic at this week's World Bank meetings is water scarcity. David Greene speaks with the co-founders of Water.org, actor Matt Damon and Gary White, about people who can't access clean water.
April 20th
On Saturday, people from around the country will take to the streets in the March for Science. Organizers say that the point of the March is not to make science political, but to highlight the reality of science to politicians, as a guide in policymaking, in which science is an uncharted issue.