Popular Science

 
POPULAR SCIENCE
June 26th
Science Here's how they do it. Certain bacteria can cause water to freeze into ice, in turn making it rain. But just how much do these tiny organisms contribute to our annual rainfall?
June 25th
Science Upside down lightning is a seemingly rare weather event. Lightning usually strikes Earth. Except when it doesn't. Read on.
June 23rd
Science Newsworthy eye candy Our favorite images from this week in science, health, and environmental news. Read on.
June 23rd
Technology The Mod Squad. With drought parching the West, seeding clouds for snow is more important than ever. Read on.
June 22nd
Environment Loma's weather in January 1972 is a fascinating exemplar of sudden temperature spikes and drops. In many parts of the U.S., it’s not uncommon for a summery afternoon to transform into a below-zero night. But no place ha…
June 21st
Environment The 2011 Las Conchas wildfire was big even before it blew up on June 27. The 2011 Las Conchas wildfire was big even before it blew up on June 27.
June 21st
Environment In 2011, a New Mexico wildfire went from normal to nuclear. Three local scientists set out to learn why. In 2011, a New Mexico wildfire went from normal to nuclear. Three local scientists set out to why. Read on.
June 21st
Science Bacteria and fungi are a menace to paintings, sculptures, and ancient artifacts. Cultural relics can be damaged by hordes of tiny invaders: bacteria, fungi, and algae.
June 20th
Environment Yes, it's happening. Here we see the number of years per decade that had above-average temperatures—and how many of those years rose a half, or even a whole, degree above the norm. Read on.
June 20th
Science Blown away. In a plot straight out of Game of Thrones, dinosaur ancestors managed to claw their way to greatness by climbing a mountain of bloodshed, aided by a force of nature.