Popular Science

 
POPULAR SCIENCE
July 31st
A smaller crazy ant (left) fights a fire ant. Lawrence Gilbert / Science There are not many creatures that can stand up to fire ants, nor their famously painful sting. Besides causing discomfort in mammals like humans (I've been stung, …
July 31st
Xamaleón as it changes. IceXperience At first, it’s a delightful shade of periwinkle blue.  Then, it turns into a lilac purple before settling on a vibrant magenta. No, these aren’t the stages of your old mood ring.  …
July 30th
Octo-mom Bruce Robison et al / PLOS ONE In April 2007, Bruce Robison and colleagues happened upon a deep-sea octopus more than 4,500 feet below the sea off California. When they came back about a month later it was guarding a clutch…
July 30th
A female nematode being invaded by sperm. Gavin Woodruff Every so often, animals looking for love will color outside the lines, taking a mate that doesn’t exactly share their own genetic code.  Such inter-species pairings can produce so…
July 29th
Who doesn't love a good mystery, especially one that stumps researchers?  Popular Science's editor-in-chief, Cliff Ransom, moderated a panel about such seemingly inexplicable phenomena this weekend at Comic-Con in San Diego. The…
July 28th
Diatoms. Images a and b are raw diatoms; c and d are fossilized, and e and f are fossilized diatoms that were frozen but not shot. Mark Burchell et al., Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Since 1996, scientists have debated about wh…
July 28th
The final graphic Office for Creative Research For the July issue of Popular Science, we—the Office for Creative Research—created a data visualization celebrating NASA’s long history of aerospace innovation. Since 1959…
July 28th
Ever since NASA established its history program in 1959, the agency has periodically compiled the world’s aeronautics advances into a single report. Assembled mostly from press releases and news stories, the documents recount coverage of budget ne…
July 26th
"Nightfall" by Isaac Asimov Illustration by Ryan Inzana This is an excerpt from Popular Science's special issue, Dispatches From The Future. Visit iTunes to download the edition onto your iPad, or return to our list of excerpts. Spo…
July 25th
Long Service U.S. National Atmospheric and Atmospheric Administration volunteer Richard Hendrickson looks out over the Atlantic Ocean sometime in the 1930s. Hendrickson still volunteers today. D. L. Hendrickson 150,000: the number of weather ob…
July 25th
The USS Honolulu Interrupts Some Polar Bears Chief Yeoman Alphonso Braggs, US-Navy via Wikimedia Commons Polar bears are the largest land predators in the world. Confined to arctic climes, they are huge, powerful swimmers, and deadly hunters. In …
July 25th
A schematic of the structure, on the left; the sponge making steam, on the right. MIT Generating steam is enormously useful. Much of the world's energy actually comes from steam--coal power plants heat up water to produce water vapor, which turns …
July 25th
"The Tolling of Pavlov's Bells" by Seanan McGuire Illustration by Lisa Kay This is an excerpt from Popular Science's special issue, Dispatches From The Future. Visit iTunes to download the edition onto your iPad, or return to our list o…
July 25th
Pacific Prey Wikimedia Commons If you're not worried about a future without toro sushi or rare tuna steaks, you probably should be. Five of the eight species of this tasty marine predator are endangered, according to the International Union for…
July 25th
An Opulent Microbial Struggle On a trip to Death Valley, California, chemist Michael P. Zach collected just a simple salt sample. Once back in the lab, he added a drop of water and put the sample in front of a microscope. The result astonished…
July 25th
These images have got some teeth. An Opulent Microbial Struggle On a trip to Death Valley, California, chemist Michael P. Zach collected just a simple salt sample. Once back in the lab, he added a drop of water and put the sample in front of a …
July 24th
Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8 One of four new images from Chandra. NASA/CXC/SAO The Space Shuttle Columbia carried the Chandra X-ray Observatory into space on July 23, 1999. To commemorate the telescope's quinceañera, NASA has released fo…
July 24th
Four new images of supernova remnants celebrate the telescope's 15 years of awesome discoveries G292.0+1.8 G292.0+1.8 lacks a catchy name, but it's one of only three known oxygen-rich supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way galaxy. This image sho…
July 24th
This is a sand fly, an insect which spreads leishmaniasis. Rod Dillon No human would be inclined to think favorably of leishmaniasis, caused by a parasite spread by sand flies, which infects about 12 million people worldwide and kills 2…
July 24th
"Night's Slow Poison" by Ann Leckie Illustration by Lisa Kay This is an excerpt from Popular Science's special issue, Dispatches From The Future. Visit iTunes to download the edition onto your iPad, or return to our list of excerpts. Th…
July 23rd
Dispatches from the Future Download a copy from iTunes. Popular Science We love science fiction here at Popular Science. Many of the real-life innovations and advances that fill our pages every month, in fact, started as pie-in-the-sk…
July 23rd
Sweet dreams This is reportedly a giant Dobsonfly, the world's largest, with a wingspan of 21 centimeters (8.3 inches), large enough to cover your face. China News Service/ Zhong Xin Gadzooks! The world's largest aquatic insect has reportedly b…
July 23rd
Forty-five years ago, on July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made the first footprints on the Moon, and it was epic. Popular Science covered this enormous achievement with an article by Wernher von Braun– a German-born engineer, now…
July 22nd
View from an Iceberg Magnus Petersen and Dave Porter prepare to lower a temperature-depth-salinity sensor into a fjord near the village of Kullorsuaq, as part of a study into changing conditions where Greenland's melting glaciers meet the ocean. …
July 22nd
Dromedary camels, which can carry MERS. Wilson44691 via Wikimedia Commons Research strongly suggests that camels carry Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), a viral illness that has sickened nearly 700 and killed at least 209 people as of earl…