Earth Science News

 
EUREKA ALERT! - EARTH SCIENCE NEWS
April 23rd
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Columbia Engineering Professor Yuan Yang has developed a new method that could lead to lithium batteries that are safer, have longer battery life, and are bendable, providing new possibilities such as flexible smartphones. His new technique uses ice-templating to control the structure of the solid electrolyte for lithium batteries that are used in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and grid-level energy storage. The study is published online April 24 in Nano Letters.
April 23rd
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is collaborating with three small businesses to address technical challenges concerning hydrogen for fuel cell cars, bio-coal and nanomaterial manufacturing.
April 23rd
(University of Stirling) The rapid decline of ancient ice sheets could help scientists predict the impact of modern-day climate and sea-level change, according to research by the universities of Stirling in Scotland and Tromsø in Norway.
April 23rd
(The University of Montana) New research by the University of Montana and its partner institutions gives insight into how forests globally will respond to long-term climate change.
April 23rd
(Experimental Biology 2017) Researchers recently confirmed it is possible to extract proteins from 80-million-year-old dinosaur bones. The discovery sparks hopes for new insights about evolution and environmental change and could even offer useful clues for drug discovery or the search for extraterrestrial life.
April 23rd
(Duke University) Three years of fracking has not contaminated groundwater in northwestern West Virginia, but accidental spills of wastewater from fracked wells may pose a threat to surface water, according to a study led by scientists at Duke University. The scientists used a broad suite of geochemical and isotopic tracers to sample for contaminants in 112 water wells near shale gas sites, including 20 wells that were sampled both before and after fracking began.
April 23rd
(Waseda University) Researchers compared the photosynthetic regulation in glaucophytes with that in cyanobacteria, to elucidate the changes caused by symbiosis in the interaction between photosynthetic electron transfer and other metabolic pathways. Their findings suggest that cyanelles of the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa retain many of the characteristics observed in their ancestral bacteria, and that C. paradoxa is the primary symbiotic algae most similar to cyanobacteria than other lineages of photosynthetic organisms in terms of metabolic interactions.
April 23rd
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A thousand times a day, thunderstorms around the globe launch fleeting bursts of gamma rays. Now scientists have studied dozens of these events fired off by Earth's biggest weather: tropical storms, hurricanes and typhoons.
April 23rd
(University of Birmingham) Ambulance response times in London worsen when air temperatures rise or fall beyond certain limits in summer and winter, according to a new study.
April 23rd
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) The unpredictable annual flow of the Nile River is legendary, as evidenced by the story of Joseph and the Pharaoh, whose dream foretold seven years of abundance followed by seven years of famine in a land whose agriculture was, and still is, utterly dependent on that flow. Now, researchers at MIT have found that climate change may drastically increase the variability in Nile's annual output.
April 23rd
(University of Helsinki) Analysis methods based on spatial data can help estimate the success of European nature conservation programs. For her doctoral dissertation, Aija Kukkala used Zonation, a conservation and land use planning software program developed at the University of Helsinki, and discovered that the EU's Natura 2000 network protects a reasonably broad variety of endangered animals.
April 23rd
(American Institute of Physics) Researchers in South Korea have quantitatively deconstructed what they describe as the 'ingenious mobility strategies' of seeds that self-burrow rotationally into soil. Seeds maneuvered to dig into soil using a coiled appendage, known as an awn, that responds to humidity. The team investigated this awn's burrowing and discovered how the nubile sprouts seem to mimic a drill to bury themselves. Their findings, published in Physics of Fluids, could have dramatic implications for improving agricultural robotics.
April 23rd
(University of Nevada, Reno) The unassuming ice plant could become an ingenious weapon in the fight against a warming climate that threatens to limit regions suitable for growing biofuel crops. Biochemist and molecular biologist John Cushman at the University of Nevada, Reno will create a gene atlas for the common ice plant that will help find ways to allow bioenergy feedstocks to better tolerate salinity and drought.
April 23rd
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Used in filtration membranes, ultrathin material could help make desalination more productive.
April 23rd
(Pensoft Publishers) A new species of silky ant has been named after the famous British band Radiohead in honor of the musicians' environmental efforts, especially in raising climate-change awareness. Two scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History report the discovery of three new species in a detailed revision of this previously poorly known genus of fungus-farming ants. Their study is published in the open access journal ZooKeys.
April 23rd
(The Optical Society) A method known as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers a cleaner, faster and simpler approach than existing technologies for detecting contaminants in the fluids coming from landfills, known as leachates.
April 23rd
(University of Exeter) Banded mongooses target close female relatives when violently ejecting members from their social groups, University of Exeter scientists have found.
April 23rd
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) The National Institutes of Natural Sciences National Institute for Fusion Science, in collaborative research with Nagoya University, has clarified through theory and simulation research that turbulence in a plasma confined in the magnetic field is suppressed and the heat and particle losses are reduced in cases with larger ion mass. This research provides a novel understanding for clarifying the 'ion mass effect' which has been a riddle since the beginning of fusion and plasma research.
April 23rd
(Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences ) A new four-step 'framework' aims to test the contribution of climate change to record-setting extreme weather events.
April 23rd
(Science China Press) A recent research reveals that India-Eurasia continental collided first in central Tibet at about 65 Ma (SCES, No.3, 2017). The earliest peripheral foreland basin related to the collision has been recognized, which developed much closer to the suture zone on the Indian continental and in which the earliest detrital material sourced from Eurasian continental had been identified. This predicts that large-scale continental subduction occurred in order to accommodate additional shortening of about 1300 km.