Earth Science News

 
EUREKA ALERT! - EARTH SCIENCE NEWS
June 25th
(Université de Genève) Mammals possess several lines of defense against microbes. One of them is activated when receptors called Fprs bind to specific molecules that are linked to pathogens. The same receptors are also present in the nose of mice, probably to detect contaminated food or sick conspecifics. Researchers from the University of Geneva describe in the journal PNAS how Fprs have acquired this olfactory role during rodent evolution, moving from the immune system to a neuronal system.
June 25th
(Silent Spring Institute) A new analysis shows that septic systems in the United States routinely discharge pharmaceuticals, consumer product chemicals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals into the environment. The study is the most comprehensive assessment to date of septic systems as important sources of emerging contaminants, raising health concerns since many of these chemicals, once discharged, end up in groundwater and drinking water supplies.
June 25th
(Canadian Science Publishing) Researchers find declining survival of juvenile steelhead trout in the ocean is strongly coupled with significant declines in populations of wild and hatchery steelhead in the Pacific Northwest
June 25th
(University of Arizona) Mounting scientific evidence shows that exercise is good not only for our bodies, but for our brains. Yet, exactly why physical activity benefits the brain is not well understood. In a new article published in the journal Trends in Neurosciences, University of Arizona researchers suggest that the link between exercise and the brain is a product of our evolutionary history and our past as hunter-gatherers.
June 25th
(Acoustical Society of America) In 22 years, Karin Heineman has been behind the camera for hundreds of scientific stories. By bringing a plethora of scientists into the world of media, she has garnered unique expertise in bridging the communication gap between those in and out of the lab. During Acoustics '17 Boston, Heineman, executive producer of Inside Science TV, will share some of her experience and highlight important elements of capturing the stories of science with video.
June 25th
(Duke University) Global solar energy production is taking a major hit due to air pollution and dust. The first study of its kind shows airborne particles and their accumulation on solar cells is cutting energy output by more than 25 percent in certain parts of the world. The regions hardest hit are also those investing the most in solar energy installations -- China, India and the Arabian Peninsula.
June 25th
(North Carolina State University) A new study from North Carolina State University finds that common wild bee species decline as urban temperatures increase.
June 25th
(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) Sandia National Laboratories chemists David Osborn and Carl Hayden have created a custom-made instrument that has enhanced the power of a method called photoelectron photoion coincidence, or PEPICO, spectroscopy.
June 25th
(University of Florida) A new study's findings point to potential for tweaking communication between human genes and advancing our ability to treat heart conditions and stimulate regenerative healing.
June 25th
(University of British Columbia) Industrial fishing fleets dump nearly 10 million tons of good fish back into the ocean every year, according to Sea Around Us research.
June 25th
(RIKEN) Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a new, yet simple, way to increase drought tolerance in a wide range of plants. Published in Nature Plants, the study reports a newly discovered biological pathway that is activated in times of drought. By working out the details of this pathway, scientists were able to induce greater tolerance for drought-like conditions simply by growing plants in vinegar.
June 25th
(University of California - Santa Barbara) And to think it was all right there in her garage.A load of boxes pulled from biologist Dale Straughan's home yielded a veritable treasure trove for UC Santa Barbara researchers studying the impact of climate change on coastal biodiversity in California.
June 25th
(CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment) Scientists have reconstructed in detail the collapse of the Eurasian ice sheet at the end of the last ice age. The big melt wreaked havoc across the European continent, driving home the original Brexit 10,000 years ago.
June 25th
(University of Miami) When pesticides and intentional fires fail to eradicate an invasive plant species, declaring biological war may be the best option.
June 25th
(Science China Press) The source of granite is crucial for its metallogenic specialization. A recent research revealed the different origins of ore-bearing granites in the Nanling Range of South China. The Middle-Late Jurassic Cu-Pb-Zn-bearing and W-bearing granites were derived from non-simultaneous partial melting of the mafic amphibolitic and the muscovite-rich metasedimentary basements, respectively.
June 25th
(University of Alberta) New research suggests hydraulic fracturing and saltwater disposal has limited impact on seismic events.
June 25th
(The Electrochemical Society) The ECS Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship Selection Committee has chosen three winners who will receive $50,000 fellowship awards each for projects in green energy technology.
June 25th
(Cornell University) In the year 2100, 2 billion people -- about one-fifth of the world's population -- could become climate change refugees due to rising ocean levels. Those who once lived on coastlines will face displacement and resettlement bottlenecks as they seek habitable places inland, according to Cornell University research.
June 25th
(University of Zurich) Over two million years ago, a third of the largest marine animals like sharks, whales, sea birds and sea turtles disappeared. This previously unknown extinction event not only had a consid-erable impact on the earth's historical biodiversity but also on the functioning of ecosystems. This has been demonstrated by researchers at the University of Zurich.
June 25th
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) A new grant sponsored by the National Science Foundation will support a research network designed to identify transdisciplinary research opportunities for scientists in the United States and China working to achieve sustainable use of natural resources for food, energy and water systems. The project is expected to add new conduits for information exchange, student training opportunities, and collaborative efforts between US and Chinese researchers in the broad sustainability and environmental change arena.