Earth Science News

 
EUREKA ALERT! - EARTH SCIENCE NEWS
October 19th
(University of Leeds) One of the largest global mass extinctions did not fundamentally change marine ecosystems, scientists have found.
October 18th
(California Academy of Sciences) A new species of striped Philippine butterflyfish -- the charismatic Roa rumsfeldi -- made a fantastic, 7,000-mile journey before surprising scientists with its unknown status. Live specimens collected from a depth of 360 feet escaped special notice until a single black fin spine tipped off aquarium biologists back in San Francisco. Deep-diving researchers from the California Academy of Sciences' Hope for Reefs team -- with genetic sequencing help from a parent-son team -- share their discovery of a fifth species of Roa this week.
October 18th
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Most people who have been unfaithful do not believe it when their partner says they forgive them. And the fact that men often do not realize that emotional infidelity is a problem just feeds the conflict.
October 18th
(University of Sheffield) Tropical rainforests continue to buffer wildlife from extreme temperatures even after logging, a new study has revealed.
October 18th
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) A Berkeley Lab-led research team has discovered a surprising set of chemical reactions involving magnesium that degrade battery performance even before the battery can be charged up. The findings could steer the design of next-gen batteries.
October 18th
(University of Arizona) A yeast protein that evolved from scratch can fold into a compact three-dimensional shape -- contrary to the general understanding of young proteins. Recent evidence suggests new genes can arise from the non-coding sections, or 'junk,' DNA and that those new genes could code for brand-new proteins. Scientists thought such newly evolved proteins were works-in-progress that could not fold into complex shapes the way more ancient proteins do.
October 18th
(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) Environmental disturbances such as El Niño shake up the marine food web off Southern California, new research shows, countering conventional thinking that the hierarchy of who-eats-who in the ocean remains largely constant over time.
October 18th
(University of Stirling) The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research.
October 18th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Depression 26W formed early on Oct. 19 and by late morning the storm was already coming unraveled in NASA satellite imagery.
October 18th
(University of Helsinki) Warmer ocean surface triggered the ice retreat during The Younger Dryas.
October 18th
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided 3-D data that showed intensifying Typhoon Lan had powerful thunderstorms stretching high into the troposphere. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image Typhoon Lan that showed the well-developed circulation.
October 18th
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) 'The autonomous HydroCamel II integrates state-of-the-art technologies, including high-level maneuvering in six degrees of freedom and an ability to dive almost vertically,' says Professor Hugo Guterman of the BGU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and head of LAR. 'Until now, these capabilities were limited to remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs), which must be tethered by an umbilical cable to a host ship for its power and air source. The HydroCamel II is completely autonomous.'
October 18th
(University of Utah) A fossilized skeleton of a tyrannosaur discovered in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was airlifted by helicopter Oct. 15, and delivered to the Natural History Museum of Utah where it will be uncovered, prepared, and studied. The fossil is approximately 76 million years old and is likely an individual of the species Teratophoneus curriei.
October 18th
(Center for Genomic Regulation) The Spanish Secretary of State for R&D+i, Carmen Vela, chaired the kickoff meeting of the new Severo Ochoa and Maria Maeztu Alliance of Excellence. The alliance's target is to internationally promote and strengthen the Spanish centres and units accredited with this distinction, to give their research a higher profile.
October 18th
(Springer) The Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) has chosen Springer's Encyclopedia of Marine Geosciences as the winner of the society's annual award for an outstanding geoscience research resource. The award will be presented on 23 October 2017 during the Geological Society of America's (GSA) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Seattle.
October 18th
(Geological Society of America) A new volume prepared in conjunction with GSA's 2017 Annual Meeting offers ten guides that geographically focus on the Seattle, Washington, area within the Puget Lowland, and also includes descriptions of trips in the Cascade Range, the region east of the Cascades, and the Columbia River Basin and western Idaho.
October 18th
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Satellites have detected powerful solar flares in the last two months, but this phenomenon has been recorded for over a century. On Sept. 10, 1886, at the age of just 17, a young amateur astronomer using a modest telescope observed from Madrid one of these sudden flashes in a sunspot. This is what researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias and the Universidad de Extremadura have recently found.
October 18th
(Michigan State University) A Michigan State University scientist is leading a federally funded effort to create a better system for predicting droughts, which cause billions of dollars in direct losses to the US economy every year.
October 18th
(Human Frontier Science Program) Svante Pääbo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig (Germany) was the 2018 HFSP Nakasone Award awarded for his discovery of the extent to which hybridization with Neanderthals and Denisovans has shaped the evolution of modern humans, and his development of techniques for sequencing DNA from fossils.
October 18th
(Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences ) The same optical fibers that deliver high-speed internet and HD video to our homes could one day double as seismic sensors for monitoring and studying earthquakes.